Comprehension

Comprehension is the heart of reading. We read to understand and learn about the world in which we live.

Fluency

Reading fluently means reading with ease. Fluency is directly related to comprehension.

Read Aloud

The building blocks of literacy begin with reading aloud and talking about books.

Vocabulary

To understand what we read, we need to understand the individual words and ideas represented.

Comprehension

9 Comprehension Strategies Active Readers Use

  1. discuss/summarize a story or facts learned in a non-fiction book
  2. check comprehension – they know that reading is supposed to make sense and use a variety of strategies to “fix” their reading.  Slow down, reread, ask questions
  3. ask questions during reading to clarify and make sense of the book
  4. create a movie or picture in their mind while reading so they can see, feel, hear, and maybe taste or smell, the story
  5. think as they read
  6. bring what they already know to the reading experience – their knowledge, experiences, memories, beliefs, and opinions, and can make a connection Before reading, the reader asks What do I already know about this topic?
  7. determine importance by thinking about the book and determining the big ideas while sifting through the details After reading, the reader asks,  What’s really important here? What are the “magnet words” (or most important words or ideas) in this passage?
  8. predict, infer, or draw conclusions before, during, and after reading
  9. synthesize or interpret a deeper understanding based on what they read, know and conclude

Read about Dr. Kaye’s research on Second Graders’ Reading Behaviors

Fluency

• words accurately and automatically without decoding
• in phrases
• with expression
• punctuation – stopping at periods and voice rising at a question mark
• at a good pace
Readers need high success texts in order to promote fluency with few adult interruptions.
Richard Allington

Read Aloud

• encourages oral language development
• builds knowledge about the world we live in
• grows vocabulary (which enables a child to read these words later)
• increases attention span and listening skills
• develops comprehension skills that reading is supposed to make sense
• inspires, informs, and/or entertains, using print media
• creates “cuddle” time with your child
• sends the message that reading matters by being a reading role model
• models fluent reading (and how reading is supposed to sound)
Book Lists (one of many lists; breaks down by grade level with classics listed at the end)

Read more about read aloud

Picture books are profound.

Susan Zimmermann, co-author of 7 Keys to Comprehension

Vocabulary

  • High frequency words (sight words) make up 75% of what we read
  • High frequency words read automatically, accurately, and quickly, impact fluency and comprehension
  • Dolch word lists are lists of high frequency words
  • School district’s vocabulary word lists (formal or informal) and standardized test vocabulary words aid in student success